Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and Imitation in American Popular Culture #2020

Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and Imitation in American Popular Culture By John Strausbaugh Darius James Black Like You Blackface Whiteface Insult and Imitation in American Popular Culture A refreshingly clearheaded and taboo breaking look at race in America reveals our culture as neither Black nor White nor Other but a mix a mongrel Black Like You is an erudite and entertaining explor
  • Title: Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and Imitation in American Popular Culture
  • Author: John Strausbaugh Darius James
  • ISBN: 9781585424986
  • Page: 474
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and Imitation in American Popular Culture By John Strausbaugh Darius James A refreshingly clearheaded and taboo breaking look at race in America reveals our culture as neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix a mongrel Black Like You is an erudite and entertaining exploration of race relations in American popular culture Particularly compelling is the author s ability to tackle blackface a strange, often scandalous, and now taboo entertainA refreshingly clearheaded and taboo breaking look at race in America reveals our culture as neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix a mongrel Black Like You is an erudite and entertaining exploration of race relations in American popular culture Particularly compelling is the author s ability to tackle blackface a strange, often scandalous, and now taboo entertainment Although blackface performance came to be denounced as purely racist mockery, and shamefacedly erased from most modern accounts of American cultural history, Strausbaugh shows that, nevertheless, its impact has been deep and longlasting The influence of blackface can be seen in rock and roll and hip hop in vaudeville, Broadway, and drag performances in Mark Twain and gangsta lit in the earliest filmstrips and Hollywood s 2004 White Chicks on radio and television in advertising and product marketing and even in the way Americans speak With remarkable common sense and clarity, Strausbaugh candidly illuminates truths about race rarely discussed in public, including American culture neither conforms to knee jerk racism nor to political correctness It is neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix a mongrel No history is best forgotten however uncomfortable it may be to remember The power of blackface to enrage and mortify Americans to this day is reason enough to examine what it still tells us about our culture and ourselves Blackface is
    Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and Imitation in American Popular Culture By John Strausbaugh Darius James

    Black Like You Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and A refreshingly clearheaded and taboo breaking look at race in America reveals our culture as neither Black nor White nor Other, but a mix a mongrel Black Like You is an erudite and entertaining exploration of race relations in American popular culture. Black Like You Blackface, Whiteface, Insult Imitation Black Like You rides a large wave of media that attempts to unearth the origins of blackface minstrels, Aunt Jemima jars, lawn jockeys, and other bizarre artifacts that lay buried under mounds of selective memory Cultural archaeologists need to dig these up because, as the book makes clear, the past often haunts the present. Black Like You An autobiography Mashaba, Herman Black Like You An autobiography Paperback June , by Herman Mashaba Author . out of stars ratings See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions Price New from Used from Kindle Please retry . Paperback Please retry . . . Kindle Black Like You by Herman Mashaba Black Like You book Read reviews from the world s largest community for readers Herman Mashaba s remarkable story begins in a small village in Gauten Black Like You, by John Strausbaugh The New York Times Jul , Black Like You documents the dominant position that the minstrel tradition held in this country s consciousness for well over a century from imported European productions in Mickey Guyton Black Like Me Lyrics YouTube Jun , Thanks for watching, like the video if you enjoyed and Subscribe for Playlist BLACKPINK How You Like That M V YouTube Jun , BLACKPINK How You Like That light up the BLACKPINK How You Like That DANCE PERFORMANCE VIDEO Jul , MORE INFO ABOUT DANCE COVER CONTEST BLACKPINK HowYouLikeThat PreReleaseSingle DANCE_PERFORMANCE_VIDEO YG Mickey Guyton Black Like Me Official Audio YouTube Jun , It s a hard life on easy street Just white painted picket fences far as you can see If you think we live in the land of the free You should try to be black l Black Like Me Storyline Black Like Me is the true account of John Griffin s experiences of passing as a black man John Horton takes treatments to darken his skin and leaves

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    About "John Strausbaugh Darius James"

    1. John Strausbaugh Darius James

      John Strausbaugh Darius James Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and Imitation in American Popular Culture book, this is one of the most wanted John Strausbaugh Darius James author readers around the world.

    188 thoughts on “Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult, and Imitation in American Popular Culture”

    1. Incredibly fascinating book about The African slave and Black American influence on American white culture and how the two cultures are intertwined At first I was angry because of the racist aspect of how White America embraced Black Culture but then I got over it and realized that Blacks took as much from White culture as They did from Blacks It reminds me of when I was a little girl and a Black soul singer did a cover of Hey Jude When I heard the Beatles version, I was highly indignant that a [...]


    2. During the late 1800 s and early 1900 s minstrel shows mocking black life in the South were well attended and received rave reviews Politicians, clergymen, and scholars filled the theaters each night to watch darkies make fools of themselves Sometimes the most talented African American performers would appear in the shows, hoping to make a name for themselves Dancing along with Caucasian men in Blackface, a style of makeup that made white people appear black and mocked black culture, they suppor [...]


    3. John Strausbaugh is a racist Caucasoid In this work of art he nonchalantly expresses his biases explaining the culture of Blackface in America and Europe He a the main mortal to attend one of these musicals and jerk off to songs like Uncle Tom the Rukus I believe that whites are infatuated with people of color To think about the time consumed in pretending to be something you re not and never will be a person with melanin Oh, my, my, my Reader beware if you re of African decent this author uses [...]


    4. This is what I wrote about the book back when I read it, in classic no capitals style this book was actually rather a disappointment it is definitely information rich, but at a certain point it becomes very clear that strausbaugh s conclusion is twofold that creole culture is inherently superior to the cultures that the creole draws from, mainly due to being interesting and fun, and that humor through offensive caricature, despite the problems, is fine, fine, finee problem with both of these p [...]


    5. Every once in a while, I find myself carrying around a book you don t want to have to explain on public transportation If you are reading this review, I have to guess you are either on my friend list, or you are trying to suss out minstrel theater s trajectory from most popular American art form to national shame and taboo and how could that have taken so long John Strausbaugh tries to answer questions like these, drawing a larger picture of theatrical ethnic caricatures of all types, including [...]


    6. Overall it was good Provided nice historical background for the minstrel show and cultural swapping in America The author s argument is that the swapping of cultures is what makes American culture what it is He also suggests that the minstrel show was the first form of pop culture in the United States and he subtley relates the early uses of minstrelsy to contemporary hip hop Read for yourself I don t want to spoil it for you He s goes a little too far by suggesting that because American culture [...]


    7. Came upon this at Powell s Books and it looked interestingUpdate O.K I m done with this little ditty and the intellectual dust still has not settled in my mind At first I was offended at some gay white Jewish dude, I m thinking Jewish from his last name, not because he details a great history of Black Face culture But because he basically calls all communities including the Black Community as being politically correct , until I ended up agreeing with him for the most part I still think he crosse [...]


    8. In short, this book is an exceptional history of what blackface and minstrelsy mean in relation to whether or not they are a racist attack or a genuine expression of love toward black people and our culture It s a complicated issue, and author John Strausbaugh sets the record straight with a cornucopia of verifiable facts and general info No joke, this is the best history book I have read since I don t don t know when.


    9. A collection of things about minstrelsy you already knew about Stephen Foster, Jewish minstrels, an inescapable past, a culture s recessive gene Still and all, not too bad.Only serious problem for me was Strausbaugh s need to inject his Ain t multi culturalism the silliest political bent into everything Gratuitous, Johnny


    10. Everyone in America should read this book I want to give it 6 stars but software prevents Why are you still here Go get this book.





    11. I really enjoyed this book Thought this book was very informative i would suggest this book to all to read my kids are going to read it next We had a great discussion on history symbolism at book club meeting A must read


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